“Every morning I get up and I pray for all sentient beings…humans, animals, even birds. They all need happiness.”

-Grandmother Tsering Dolma Gyaltong, Tibetan

 

One afternoon a few months ago when I was feeding our two old sweeties, Baby’s people were walking her back from the barn.

She nickered as she approached. I think it was as much to say hello to me, as it was to greet her herd. Baby is one of my biggest fans because she LOVES the treats I hand out.

I tried to start a conversation. “Hi, I’m Jean.”

The twenty-something girl responded with a lukewarm response.

“She’s such a pretty little thing,” I said as I looked at Baby.

“I guess, but I hope her coat turns darker. Right now, I think she’s kind of ugly.”

I stroked Baby’s neck. “Well, I think she’s adorable just as she is.”

Silence.

The young woman led Baby into the pasture, and then secured the gate. “I don’t know why she hangs out with all these old horses,” she said.

I thought her tone was rather snippy.

“I think she feels safe in this herd,” I answered, not sure why I bothered to continue the discussion.

I felt protective of Baby, who didn’t need to hear that in someone’s eyes, she wasn’t good enough. No one needs to hear that – horse or human.

 

I felt protective of the band of oldsters who indeed took her in last February when she was new to the pasture. As a yearling, she was inexperienced and vulnerable.  The oldsters provided safety when she was being chased all over the pasture by the young, upstart horses. I wondered if Baby’s people knew any of this.

 

But what stayed with me all these months later are this young woman’s comments about the old horses. It was as if she really believes they have no value. Like it is something shameful that Baby lives among old horses. And is quite happy with them.

 

The International Council of Grandmothers

In one of my favorite magazines, Spirituality and Health, I recently read about thirteen grandmothers from indigenous tribes around the world who have come together to promote peace and healing in the world. Each grandmother is a healer in her own tradition. There are medicine women, shamans, and curanderos from Alaska, North, South and Central America, Africa, and Asia. They travel around the world offering blessings and gentle care of Mother Earth. They came together because of a shared vision and prophecy, seeded long ago. Their work is to heal the earth.

 

They’ve met with the Pope and the Dalai Lama. While their skin may be wrinkled and their bodies bent with age, make no mistake. These are women of great power. And they have something profound to tell us.

 

One way they get their voice into the world is through a film, For the Next 7 Generations. I hope you take the two minutes to view the trailer. I get teary each time I watch.

 

Is it possible that these thirteen grandmothers can bring peace and healing to this crazy world? It’s a thought that comforts me. I love knowing that they are quietly going about their work offering prayers, blessings and perhaps a spell or two just to make sure things stick.

 

As for Baby, she’s already learned the magic of being with the elders.

 

 

 

 

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